Recent Submissions

  • Journal Article

    The Relations of Vocational Interests and Mathematical Literacy : On the Predictive Power of Interest Profiles 

    Warwas, Jasmin; Nagy, Gabriel; Watermann, Rainer; Hasselhorn, Marcus
    Journal of Career Assessment 2009; 17(4) p.417-438
    This study examines the relationships of vocational interests and mathematical literacy both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Extending previous research, the results of Holland’s RIASEC (Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional) scale scores are compared with results from a reductionist approach using individual interest profiles (including the parameters level, differentiation, and orientation). Both analyses find significant relations between interests and mathematical literacy. The scale score analyses reveal positive associations of Realistic interests with mathematical literacy, whereas Artistic interests show a negative association. Interest profiles from a dimensional representation show individuals with interest orientations close to the Realistic domain score highest on mathematical literacy, with those with interests in both Artistic and Social domains scoring lowest. Results from profile analyses suggest that interest differentiation moderates the interest—ability relation. Only interest profiles are predictive for mathematical literacy over and above covariates, indicating that interest profiles are more robust predictors than the scale scores. Analyses show that interest profiles are a valid reduction of the scale score models.
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  • Journal Article

    The Loss of Biodiversity as a Challenge for Sustainable Development: How Do Pupils in Chile and Germany Perceive Resource Dilemmas? 

    Menzel, Susanne; Bögeholz, Susanne
    Research in science education 2008; 39(4) p.429-447
    The topic of biodiversity is of high value for education for sustainable development as it reflects the interaction of ecological, economic and social issues particularly well. Especially in so-called biodiversity hotspots, among them Chile, natural resources are often depleted for economic interest which, in many cases, is required income. Therefore, economic and social aspects must be considered in order to fully understand biodiversity loss. Being such an important issue, it is surprising that little is known thus far about learning prerequisites concerning biodiversity. This paper presents a qualitative interview study that investigated 16 to 18-year-old Chilean and German learners’ perception of biodiversity and its loss (n=24). Firstly, the pupils’ cognitive frameworks were analysed. Secondly, subjective theories about biodiversity loss due to resource dilemmas were explored. Three subjective theories that emerged from the data reflected the notion that most pupils focused on either ecological or economic aspects of biodiversity loss. Pupils who concentrated on ecological aspects often referred to incorrect ecological facts. Moreover, these pupils showed difficulties in developing empathy and solidarity with impoverished people, who depend economically on plants in a resource dilemma. A smaller group of pupils succeeded in integrating the ecological, economic, and social aspects. Regarding the two samples, Chilean pupils seemed to have greater difficulties in recognising the social aspects of biodiversity loss, while German pupils were largely unaware of biodiversity loss on a local level. Implications for biodiversity education and future research will be outlined and discussed.
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