Zuletzt publiziert

  • Zeitschriftenartikel

    Breakdown of local information processing may underlie isoflurane anesthesia effects. 

    Wollstadt, Patricia; Sellers, Kristin K; Rudelt, Lucas; Priesemann, Viola; Hutt, Axel; Fröhlich, Flavio; Wibral, Michael
    PLoS computational biology 2017-06; 13(6): Art. e1005511
    The disruption of coupling between brain areas has been suggested as the mechanism underlying loss of consciousness in anesthesia. This hypothesis has been tested previously by measuring the information transfer between brain areas, and by taking reduced information transfer as a proxy for decoupling. Yet, information transfer is a function of the amount of information available in the information source-such that transfer decreases even for unchanged coupling when less source information is available. Therefore, we reconsidered past interpretations of reduced information transfer as a sign of decoupling, and asked whether impaired local information processing leads to a loss of information transfer. An important prediction of this alternative hypothesis is that changes in locally available information (signal entropy) should be at least as pronounced as changes in information transfer. We tested this prediction by recording local field potentials in two ferrets after administration of isoflurane in concentrations of 0.0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. We found strong decreases in the source entropy under isoflurane in area V1 and the prefrontal cortex (PFC)-as predicted by our alternative hypothesis. The decrease in source entropy was stronger in PFC compared to V1. Information transfer between V1 and PFC was reduced bidirectionally, but with a stronger decrease from PFC to V1. This links the stronger decrease in information transfer to the stronger decrease in source entropy-suggesting reduced source entropy reduces information transfer. This conclusion fits the observation that the synaptic targets of isoflurane are located in local cortical circuits rather than on the synapses formed by interareal axonal projections. Thus, changes in information transfer under isoflurane seem to be a consequence of changes in local processing more than of decoupling between brain areas. We suggest that source entropy changes must be considered whenever interpreting changes in information transfer as decoupling.
    Dokument ansehen Zusammenfassung
  • Zeitschriftenartikel

    What makes a reach movement effortful? Physical effort discounting supports common minimization principles in decision making and motor control. 

    Morel, Pierre; Ulbrich, Philipp; Gail, Alexander
    PLoS biology 2017-06; 15(6): Art. e2001323
    When deciding between alternative options, a rational agent chooses on the basis of the desirability of each outcome, including associated costs. As different options typically result in different actions, the effort associated with each action is an essential cost parameter. How do humans discount physical effort when deciding between movements? We used an action-selection task to characterize how subjective effort depends on the parameters of arm transport movements and controlled for potential confounding factors such as delay discounting and performance. First, by repeatedly asking subjects to choose between 2 arm movements of different amplitudes or durations, performed against different levels of force, we identified parameter combinations that subjects experienced as identical in effort (isoeffort curves). Movements with a long duration were judged more effortful than short-duration movements against the same force, while movement amplitudes did not influence effort. Biomechanics of the movements also affected effort, as movements towards the body midline were preferred to movements away from it. Second, by introducing movement repetitions, we further determined that the cost function for choosing between effortful movements had a quadratic relationship with force, while choices were made on the basis of the logarithm of these costs. Our results show that effort-based action selection during reaching cannot easily be explained by metabolic costs. Instead, force-loaded reaches, a widely occurring natural behavior, imposed an effort cost for decision making similar to cost functions in motor control. Our results thereby support the idea that motor control and economic choice are governed by partly overlapping optimization principles.
    Dokument ansehen Zusammenfassung
  • Zeitschriftenartikel

    Working Memory Requires a Combination of Transient and Attractor-Dominated Dynamics to Process Unreliably Timed Inputs. 

    Nachstedt, Timo; Tetzlaff, Christian
    Scientific reports 2017-05-30; 7(1): Art. 2473
    Working memory stores and processes information received as a stream of continuously incoming stimuli. This requires accurate sequencing and it remains puzzling how this can be reliably achieved by the neuronal system as our perceptual inputs show a high degree of temporal variability. One hypothesis is that accurate timing is achieved by purely transient neuronal dynamics; by contrast a second hypothesis states that the underlying network dynamics are dominated by attractor states. In this study, we resolve this contradiction by theoretically investigating the performance of the system using stimuli with differently accurate timing. Interestingly, only the combination of attractor and transient dynamics enables the network to perform with a low error rate. Further analysis reveals that the transient dynamics of the system are used to process information, while the attractor states store it. The interaction between both types of dynamics yields experimentally testable predictions and we show that this way the system can reliably interact with a timing-unreliable Hebbian-network representing long-term memory. Thus, this study provides a potential solution to the long-standing problem of the basic neuronal dynamics underlying working memory.
    Dokument ansehen Zusammenfassung
  • Zeitschriftenartikel

    Subsampling scaling 

    Levina, A.; Priesemann, V.
    Nature Communications 2017; 8: Art. 15140
    In real-world applications, observations are often constrained to a small fraction of a system. Such spatial subsampling can be caused by the inaccessibility or the sheer size of the system, and cannot be overcome by longer sampling. Spatial subsampling can strongly bias inferences about a system’s aggregated properties. To overcome the bias, we derive analytically a subsampling scaling framework that is applicable to different observables, including distributions of neuronal avalanches, of number of people infected during an epidemic outbreak, and of node degrees. We demonstrate how to infer the correct distributions of the underlying full system, how to apply it to distinguish critical from subcritical systems, and how to disentangle subsampling and finite size effects. Lastly, we apply subsampling scaling to neuronal avalanche models and to recordings from developing neural networks. We show that only mature, but not young networks follow power-law scaling, indicating self-organization to criticality during development.
    Dokument ansehen Zusammenfassung
  • Zeitschriftenartikel

    Fast Dynamical Coupling Enhances Frequency Adaptation of Oscillators for Robotic Locomotion Control 

    Nachstedt, Timo; Tetzlaff, Christian; Manoonpong, Poramate
    Frontiers in Neurorobotics 2017; 11: Art. 14
    Rhythmic neural signals serve as basis of many brain processes, in particular of locomotion control and generation of rhythmic movements. It has been found that specific neural circuits, named central pattern generators (CPGs), are able to autonomously produce such rhythmic activities. In order to tune, shape and coordinate the produced rhythmic activity, CPGs require sensory feedback, i.e., external signals. Nonlinear oscillators are a standard model of CPGs and are used in various robotic applications. A special class of nonlinear oscillators are adaptive frequency oscillators (AFOs). AFOs are able to adapt their frequency toward the frequency of an external periodic signal and to keep this learned frequency once the external signal vanishes. AFOs have been successfully used, for instance, for resonant tuning of robotic locomotion control. However, the choice of parameters for a standard AFO is characterized by a trade-off between the speed of the adaptation and its precision and, additionally, is strongly dependent on the range of frequencies the AFO is confronted with. As a result, AFOs are typically tuned such that they require a comparably long time for their adaptation. To overcome the problem, here, we improve the standard AFO by introducing a novel adaptation mechanism based on dynamical coupling strengths. The dynamical adaptation mechanism enhances both the speed and precision of the frequency adaptation. In contrast to standard AFOs, in this system, the interplay of dynamics on short and long time scales enables fast as well as precise adaptation of the oscillator for a wide range of frequencies. Amongst others, a very natural implementation of this mechanism is in terms of neural networks. The proposed system enables robotic applications which require fast retuning of locomotion control in order to react to environmental changes or conditions.
    Dokument ansehen Zusammenfassung
  • Zeitschriftenartikel

    Gender bias in scholarly peer review 

    Helmer, Markus; Schottdorf, Manuel; Neef, Andreas; Battaglia, Demian
    eLife 2017; 6: Art. 21718
    Peer review is the cornerstone of scholarly publishing and it is essential that peer reviewers are appointed on the basis of their expertise alone. However, it is difficult to check for any bias in the peer-review process because the identity of peer reviewers generally remains confidential. Here, using public information about the identities of 9000 editors and 43000 reviewers from the Frontiers series of journals, we show that women are underrepresented in the peer-review process, that editors of both genders operate with substantial same-gender preference (homophily), and that the mechanisms of this homophily are gender-dependent. We also show that homophily will persist even if numerical parity between genders is reached, highlighting the need for increased efforts to combat subtler forms of gender bias in scholarly publishing.
    Dokument ansehen Zusammenfassung
  • Zeitschriftenartikel

    Enhanced Locomotion Efficiency of a Bio-inspired Walking Robot using Contact Surfaces with Frictional Anisotropy 

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Petersen, Dennis; Kovalev, Alexander; Wörgötter, Florentin; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Spinner, Marlene; Heepe, Lars
    Scientific Reports 2016; 6: Art. 39455
    Based on the principles of morphological computation, we propose a novel approach that exploits the interaction between a passive anisotropic scale-like material (e.g., shark skin) and a non-smooth substrate to enhance locomotion efficiency of a robot walking on inclines. Real robot experiments show that passive tribologically-enhanced surfaces of the robot belly or foot allow the robot to grip on specific surfaces and move effectively with reduced energy consumption. Supplementing the robot experiments, we investigated tribological properties of the shark skin as well as its mechanical stability. It shows high frictional anisotropy due to an array of sloped denticles. The orientation of the denticles to the underlying collagenous material also strongly influences their mechanical interlocking with the substrate. This study not only opens up a new way of achieving energy-efficient legged robot locomotion but also provides a better understanding of the functionalities and mechanical properties of anisotropic surfaces. That understanding will assist developing new types of material for other realworld applications.
    Dokument ansehen Zusammenfassung
  • Zeitschriftenartikel

    Neurons in Primate Visual Cortex Alternate between Responses to Multiple Stimuli in Their Receptive Field 

    Li, Kang; Kozyrev, Vladislav; Kyllingsbæk, Søren; Treue, Stefan; Ditlevsen, Susanne; Bundesen, Claus
    Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience 2016; 10: Art. 141
    A fundamental question concerning representation of the visual world in our brain is how a cortical cell responds when presented with more than a single stimulus. We find supportive evidence that most cells presented with a pair of stimuli respond predominantly to one stimulus at a time, rather than a weighted average response. Traditionally, the firing rate is assumed to be a weighted average of the firing rates to the individual stimuli (response-averaging model) (Bundesen et al., 2005). Here, we also evaluate a probability-mixing model (Bundesen et al., 2005), where neurons temporally multiplex the responses to the individual stimuli. This provides a mechanism by which the representational identity of multiple stimuli in complex visual scenes can be maintained despite the large receptive fields in higher extrastriate visual cortex in primates. We compare the two models through analysis of data from single cells in the middle temporal visual area (MT) of rhesus monkeys when presented with two separate stimuli inside their receptive field with attention directed to one of the two stimuli or outside the receptive field. The spike trains were modeled by stochastic point processes, including memory effects of past spikes and attentional effects, and statistical model selection between the two models was performed by information theoretic measures as well as the predictive accuracy of the models. As an auxiliary measure, we also tested for uni- or multimodality in interspike interval distributions, and performed a correlation analysis of simultaneously recorded pairs of neurons, to evaluate population behavior.
    Dokument ansehen Zusammenfassung
  • Zeitschriftenartikel

    Long-term decoding of movement force and direction with a wireless myoelectric implant 

    Morel, Pierre; Ferrea, Enrico; Taghizadeh-Sarshouri, Bahareh; Audí, Josep Marcel Cardona; Ruff, Roman; Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter; Lewis, Sören; Russold, Michael; Dietl, Hans; Abu-Saleh, Lait; et al.
    Schroeder, DietmarKrautschneider, WolfgangMeiners, ThomasGail, Alexander
    Journal of Neural Engineering 2015; 13(1)
    Objective. The ease of use and number of degrees of freedom of current myoelectric hand prostheses is limited by the information content and reliability of the surface electromyography (sEMG) signals used to control them. For example, cross-talk limits the capacity to pick up signals from small or deep muscles, such as the forearm muscles for distal arm amputations, or sites of targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) for proximal amputations. Here we test if signals recorded from the fully implanted, induction-powered wireless Myoplant system allow longterm decoding of continuous as well as discrete movement parameters with better reliability than equivalent sEMG recordings. The Myoplant system uses a centralized implant to transmit broadband EMG activity from four distributed bipolar epimysial electrodes. Approach. Two Rhesus macaques received implants in their backs, while electrodes were placed in their upper arm. One of the monkeys was trained to do a cursor task via a haptic robot, allowing us to control the forces exerted by the animal during arm movements. The second animal was trained to perform a center-out reaching task on a touchscreen. We compared the implanted system with concurrent sEMG recordings by evaluating our ability to decode time-varying force in one animal and discrete reach directions in the other from multiple features extracted from the raw EMG signals. Main results. In both cases, data from the implant allowed a decoder trained with data from a single day to maintain an accurate decoding performance during the following months, which was not the case for concurrent surface EMG recordings conducted simultaneously over the same muscles. Significance. These results show that a fully implantable,centralized wireless EMG system is particularly suited for long-term stable decoding of dynamic movements in demanding applications such as advanced forelimb prosthetics in a wide range of configurations (distal amputations, TMR).
    Dokument ansehen Zusammenfassung
  • Zeitschriftenartikel

    Mechanisms and functional roles of glutamatergic synapse diversity in a cerebellar circuit 

    Zampini, Valeria; Liu, Jian K.; Diana, Marco A.; Maldonado, Paloma P.; Brunel, Nicolas; Dieudonné, Stéphane
    eLife 2016; 5
    Synaptic currents display a large degree of heterogeneity of their temporal characteristics, but the functional role of such heterogeneities remains unknown. We investigated in rat cerebellar slices synaptic currents in Unipolar Brush Cells (UBCs), which generate intrinsic mossy fibers relaying vestibular inputs to the cerebellar cortex. We show that UBCs respond to sinusoidal modulations of their sensory input with heterogeneous amplitudes and phase shifts. Experiments and modeling indicate that this variability results both from the kinetics of synaptic glutamate transients and from the diversity of postsynaptic receptors. While phase inversion is produced by an mGluR2-activated outward conductance in OFF-UBCs, the phase delay of ON UBCs is caused by a late rebound current resulting from AMPAR recovery from desensitization. Granular layer network modeling indicates that phase dispersion of UBC responses generates diverse phase coding in the granule cell population, allowing climbing-fiber-driven Purkinje cell learning at arbitrary phases of the vestibular input.
    Dokument ansehen Zusammenfassung
  • Zeitschriftenartikel

    Visual attention is available at a task-relevant location rapidly after a saccade 

    Yao, Tao; Ketkar, Madhura; Treue, Stefan; Krishna, B. Suresh
    eLife 2016; 5: Art. e18009
    Maintaining attention at a task-relevant spatial location while making eye-movements necessitates a rapid, saccade-synchronized shift of attentional modulation from the neuronal population representing the task-relevant location before the saccade to the one representing it after the saccade. Currently, the precise time at which spatial attention becomes fully allocated to the task-relevant location after the saccade remains unclear. Using a fine-grained temporal analysis of human peri-saccadic detection performance in an attention task, we show that spatial attention is fully available at the task-relevant location within 30 milliseconds after the saccade. Subjects tracked the attentional target veridically throughout our task: i.e. they almost never responded to non-target stimuli. Spatial attention and saccadic processing therefore co-ordinate well to ensure that relevant locations are attentionally enhanced soon after the beginning of each eye fixation.
    Dokument ansehen Zusammenfassung
  • Zeitschriftenartikel

    Detection of Multiple Innervation Zones from Multi-Channel Surface EMG Recordings with Low Signal-to-Noise Ratio Using Graph-Cut Segmentation 

    Marateb, Hamid Reza; Farahi, Morteza; Rojas, Monica; Mañanas, Miguel Angel; Farina, Dario
    PLOS ONE 2016; 11(12): Art. e0167954
    Knowledge of the location of muscle Innervation Zones (IZs) is important in many applications, e.g. for minimizing the quantity of injected botulinum toxin for the treatment of spasticity or for deciding on the type of episiotomy during child delivery. Surface EMG (sEMG) can be noninvasively recorded to assess physiological and morphological characteristics of contracting muscles. However, it is not often possible to record signals of high quality. Moreover, muscles could have multiple IZs, which should all be identified. We designed a fully-automatic algorithm based on the enhanced image Graph-Cut segmentation and morphological image processing methods to identify up to five IZs in 60-ms intervals of very-low to moderate quality sEMG signal detected with multi-channel electrodes (20 bipolar channels with Inter Electrode Distance (IED) of 5 mm). An anisotropic multilayered cylinder model was used to simulate 750 sEMG signals with signal-to-noise ratio ranging from -5 to 15 dB (using Gaussian noise) and in each 60-ms signal frame, 1 to 5 IZs were included. The micro- and macro- averaged performance indices were then reported for the proposed IZ detection algorithm. In the micro-averaging procedure, the number of True Positives, False Positives and False Negatives in each frame were summed up to generate cumulative measures. In the macro-averaging, on the other hand, precision and recall were calculated for each frame and their averages are used to determine F1-score. Overall, the micro (macro)-averaged sensitivity, precision and F1-score of the algorithm for IZ channel identification were 82.7% (87.5%), 92.9% (94.0%) and 87.5% (90.6%), respectively. For the correctly identified IZ locations, the average bias error was of 0.02±0.10 IED ratio. Also, the average absolute conduction velocity estimation error was 0.41±0.40 m/s for such frames. The sensitivity analysis including increasing IED and reducing interpolation coefficient for time samples was performed. Meanwhile, the effect of adding power-line interference and using other image interpolation methods on the deterioration of the performance of the proposed algorithm was investigated. The average running time of the proposed algorithm on each 60-ms sEMG frame was 25.5±8.9 (s) on an Intel dual-core 1.83 GHz CPU with 2 GB of RAM. The proposed algorithm correctly and precisely identified multiple IZs in each signal epoch in a wide range of signal quality and is thus a promising new offline tool for electrophysiological studies.
    Dokument ansehen Zusammenfassung
  • Zeitschriftenartikel

    Using Matrix and Tensor Factorizations for the Single-Trial Analysis of Population Spike Trains 

    Onken, Arno; Liu, Jian K.; Karunasekara, P. P. Chamanthi R.; Delis, Ioannis; Gollisch, Tim; Panzeri, Stefano
    PLOS Computational Biology 2016; 12(11): Art. e1005189
    Advances in neuronal recording techniques are leading to ever larger numbers of simultaneously monitored neurons. This poses the important analytical challenge of how to capture compactly all sensory information that neural population codes carry in their spatial dimension (differences in stimulus tuning across neurons at different locations), in their temporal dimension (temporal neural response variations), or in their combination (temporally coordinated neural population firing). Here we investigate the utility of tensor factorizations of population spike trains along space and time. These factorizations decompose a dataset of single-trial population spike trains into spatial firing patterns (combinations of neurons firing together), temporal firing patterns (temporal activation of these groups of neurons) and trial-dependent activation coefficients (strength of recruitment of such neural patterns on each trial). We validated various factorization methods on simulated data and on populations of ganglion cells simultaneously recorded in the salamander retina. We found that single-trial tensor space-by-time decompositions provided low-dimensional data-robust representations of spike trains that capture efficiently both their spatial and temporal information about sensory stimuli. Tensor decompositions with orthogonality constraints were the most efficient in extracting sensory information, whereas non-negative tensor decompositions worked well even on non-independent and overlapping spike patterns, and retrieved informative firing patterns expressed by the same population in response to novel stimuli. Our method showed that populations of retinal ganglion cells carried information in their spike timing on the ten-milliseconds-scale about spatial details of natural images. This information could not be recovered from the spike counts of these cells. First-spike latencies carried the majority of information provided by the whole spike train about fine-scale image features, and supplied almost as much information about coarse natural image features as firing rates. Together, these results highlight the importance of spike timing, and particularly of first-spike latencies, in retinal coding.
    Dokument ansehen Zusammenfassung
  • Zeitschriftenartikel

    Characterization of In-Body to On-Body Wireless Radio Frequency Link for Upper Limb Prostheses. 

    Stango, Antonietta; Yazdandoost, Kamya Yekeh; Negro, Francesco; Farina, Dario
    PloS one 2016; 11(10): Art. e0164987
    Wireless implanted devices can be used to interface patients with disabilities with the aim of restoring impaired motor functions. Implanted devices that record and transmit electromyographic (EMG) signals have been applied for the control of active prostheses. This simulation study investigates the propagation losses and the absorption rate of a wireless radio frequency link for in-to-on body communication in the medical implant communication service (MICS) frequency band to control myoelectric upper limb prostheses. The implanted antenna is selected and a suitable external antenna is designed. The characterization of both antennas is done by numerical simulations. A heterogeneous 3D body model and a 3D electromagnetic solver have been used to model the path loss and to characterize the specific absorption rate (SAR). The path loss parameters were extracted and the SAR was characterized, verifying the compliance with the guideline limits. The path loss model has been also used for a preliminary link budget analysis to determine the feasibility of such system compliant with the IEEE 802.15.6 standard. The resulting link margin of 11 dB confirms the feasibility of the system proposed.
    Dokument ansehen Zusammenfassung
  • Zeitschriftenartikel

    Induction and Consolidation of Calcium-Based Homo- and Heterosynaptic Potentiation and Depression. 

    Li, Yinyun; Kulvicius, Tomas; Tetzlaff, Christian
    PloS one 2016; 11(8): Art. e0161679
    The adaptive mechanisms of homo- and heterosynaptic plasticity play an important role in learning and memory. In order to maintain plasticity-induced changes for longer time scales (up to several days), they have to be consolidated by transferring them from a short-lasting early-phase to a long-lasting late-phase state. The underlying processes of this synaptic consolidation are already well-known for homosynaptic plasticity, however, it is not clear whether the same processes also enable the induction and consolidation of heterosynaptic plasticity. In this study, by extending a generic calcium-based plasticity model with the processes of synaptic consolidation, we show in simulations that indeed heterosynaptic plasticity can be induced and, furthermore, consolidated by the same underlying processes as for homosynaptic plasticity. Furthermore, we show that by local diffusion processes the heterosynaptic effect can be restricted to a few synapses neighboring the homosynaptically changed ones. Taken together, this generic model reproduces many experimental results of synaptic tagging and consolidation, provides several predictions for heterosynaptic induction and consolidation, and yields insights into the complex interactions between homo- and heterosynaptic plasticity over a broad variety of time (minutes to days) and spatial scales (several micrometers).
    Dokument ansehen Zusammenfassung
  • Zeitschriftenartikel

    When less is more: non-monotonic spike sequence processing in neurons. 

    Arnoldt, Hinrich; Chang, Shuwen; Jahnke, Sven; Urmersbach, Birk; Taschenberger, Holger; Timme, Marc
    PLoS computational biology 2015-02-01; 11(2): Art. e1004002
    Fundamental response properties of neurons centrally underly the computational capabilities of both individual nerve cells and neural networks. Most studies on neuronal input-output relations have focused on continuous-time inputs such as constant or noisy sinusoidal currents. Yet, most neurons communicate via exchanging action potentials (spikes) at discrete times. Here, we systematically analyze the stationary spiking response to regular spiking inputs and reveal that it is generically non-monotonic. Our theoretical analysis shows that the underlying mechanism relies solely on a combination of the discrete nature of the communication by spikes, the capability of locking output to input spikes and limited resources required for spike processing. Numerical simulations of mathematically idealized and biophysically detailed models, as well as neurophysiological experiments confirm and illustrate our theoretical predictions.
    Dokument ansehen Zusammenfassung
  • Zeitschriftenartikel

    Opposing Effects of Neuronal Activity on Structural Plasticity. 

    Fauth, Michael; Tetzlaff, Christian
    Frontiers in neuroanatomy 2016; 10: Art. 75
    The connectivity of the brain is continuously adjusted to new environmental influences by several activity-dependent adaptive processes. The most investigated adaptive mechanism is activity-dependent functional or synaptic plasticity regulating the transmission efficacy of existing synapses. Another important but less prominently discussed adaptive process is structural plasticity, which changes the connectivity by the formation and deletion of synapses. In this review, we show, based on experimental evidence, that structural plasticity can be classified similar to synaptic plasticity into two categories: (i) Hebbian structural plasticity, which leads to an increase (decrease) of the number of synapses during phases of high (low) neuronal activity and (ii) homeostatic structural plasticity, which balances these changes by removing and adding synapses. Furthermore, based on experimental and theoretical insights, we argue that each type of structural plasticity fulfills a different function. While Hebbian structural changes enhance memory lifetime, storage capacity, and memory robustness, homeostatic structural plasticity self-organizes the connectivity of the neural network to assure stability. However, the link between functional synaptic and structural plasticity as well as the detailed interactions between Hebbian and homeostatic structural plasticity are more complex. This implies even richer dynamics requiring further experimental and theoretical investigations.
    Dokument ansehen Zusammenfassung
  • Zeitschriftenartikel

    Self-organization of computation in neural systems by interaction between homeostatic and synaptic plasticity 

    Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Tetzlaff, Christian; Kulvicius, Tomas; Wörgötter, Florentin
    BMC Neuroscience 2015; 16(Suppl 1): Art. O5
    Dokument ansehen
  • Poster Präsentation

    Induction and consolidation of calcium-based homo- and heterosynaptic potentiation and depression 

    Li, Yinyun; Kulvicius, Tomas; Tetzlaff, Christian
    BMC Neuroscience 2015; 16(Suppl 1): Art. P252
    Dokument ansehen
  • Poster Präsentation

    Towards a biological plausible model of the interaction of long-term memory and working memory 

    Nachstedt, Timo; Wörgötter, Florentin; Tetzlaff, Christian
    BMC Neuroscience 2015; 16(Suppl 1): Art. P254
    Dokument ansehen

View more