Show simple item record

Consumer Preferences for Different Designs of Carbon Footprint Labelling on Tomatoes in Germany—Does Design Matter?

dc.contributor.authorMeyerding, Stephan
dc.contributor.authorSchaffmann, Anna-Lena
dc.contributor.authorLehberger, Mira
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-01T09:53:08Z
dc.date.available2019-04-01T09:53:08Z
dc.date.issued2019de
dc.identifier.urihttp://resolver.sub.uni-goettingen.de/purl?gs-1/15995
dc.description.abstractThe climate impact of tomato production is an important issue in the sustainability of tomatoes, especially in northern European countries, such as Germany. Communicating the climate impact of products to the consumer is difficult and the design of the label might be the key to its success. For this reason, the present study compares the utilities of six different carbon footprint labels to evaluate which label design works best for the consumer. 598 consumers were surveyed in a representative online choice-experiment. The participants had to choose between tomatoes with different product characteristics, such as origin, price, organic label, and carbon footprint label. A split sample approach was used where each sub-sample with around n = 100 saw a different carbon footprint label design in the choice-experiment. The results suggest that qualitative carbon footprint labels using color-coded traffic light labelling are superior to those that claim climate impact reduction or neutrality, including those that provide more details regarding the climate impact of the product and the company. The latent class analysis with four consumer segments shows that a significant proportion of consumers in Germany would consider a carbon footprint label as an important characteristic.de
dc.description.sponsorshipOpen-Access-Publiaktionsfonds 2019
dc.language.isoengde
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectproduct carbon footprint label; marketing; consumer preferences; choice-based con-joint analysis; latent class analysisde
dc.subject.ddc630
dc.titleConsumer Preferences for Different Designs of Carbon Footprint Labelling on Tomatoes in Germany—Does Design Matter?de
dc.typejournalArticlede
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/su11061587
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionde
dc.relation.eISSN2071-1050
dc.bibliographicCitation.volume11de
dc.bibliographicCitation.issue6de
dc.type.subtypejournalArticle
dc.bibliographicCitation.articlenumber1587de
dc.description.statuspeerReviewedde
dc.bibliographicCitation.journalSustainabilityde


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

These documents are avalilable under the license:
openAccess