Recent Submissions

  • Journal Article

    Ultrafast optogenetic stimulation of the auditory pathway by targeting‐optimized Chronos 

    Keppeler, Daniel; Merino, Ricardo Martins; Lopez de la Morena, David; Bali, Burak; Huet, Antoine Tarquin; Gehrt, Anna; Wrobel, Christian; Subramanian, Swati; Dombrowski, Tobias; Wolf, Fred; et al.
    Rankovic, VladanNeef, AndreasMoser, Tobias
    The EMBO Journal 2018; 37(24): Art. e99649
    Optogenetic tools, providing non‐invasive control over selected cells, have the potential to revolutionize sensory prostheses for humans. Optogenetic stimulation of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the ear provides a future alternative to electrical stimulation used in cochlear implants. However, most channelrhodopsins do not support the high temporal fidelity pertinent to auditory coding because they require milliseconds to close after light‐off. Here, we biophysically characterized the fast channelrhodopsin Chronos and revealed a deactivation time constant of less than a millisecond at body temperature. In order to enhance neural expression, we improved its trafficking to the plasma membrane (Chronos‐ES/TS). Following efficient transduction of SGNs using early postnatal injection of the adeno‐associated virus AAV‐PHP.B into the mouse cochlea, fiber‐based optical stimulation elicited optical auditory brainstem responses (oABR) with minimal latencies of 1 ms, thresholds of 5 μJ and 100 μs per pulse, and sizable amplitudes even at 1,000 Hz of stimulation. Recordings from single SGNs demonstrated good temporal precision of light‐evoked spiking. In conclusion, efficient virus‐mediated expression of targeting‐optimized Chronos‐ES/TS achieves ultrafast optogenetic control of neurons.
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  • Journal Article

    Public provision of emergency obstetric care: a case study in two districts of Pakistan 

    Brückmann, Peter; Hashmi, Ashfa; Kuch, Marina; Kuhnt, Jana; Monfared, Ida; Vollmer, Sebastian
    BMJ Open 2019; 9(5): Art. e027187
    Objectives Pakistan is one out of five countries where together half of the global neonatal deaths occur. As the provision of services and facilities is one of the key elements vital to reducing this rate as well as the maternal mortality rate, this study investigates the status of the delivery of essential obstetric care provided by the public health sector in two districts in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa in 2015 aiming to highlight areas where critical improvements are needed. Setting We analysed data from a survey of 22 primary and secondary healthcare facilities as well as 85 community midwives (CMWs) in Haripur and Nowshera districts. Participants Using a structured questionnaire we evaluated the performance of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) signal functions and patient statistics in public health facilities. Also, 102 CMWs were interviewed about working hours, basic and specialised delivery service provision, referral system and patient statistics. Primary outcome measures We investigate the public provision of emergency obstetric care using seven key medical services identified by the United Nations (UN). Results Deliveries by public health cadres account for about 30% of the total number of births in these districts. According to the UN benchmark, only a small fraction of basic EmOC (2/18) and half of the comprehensive EmOC (2/4) facilities of the recommended minimum number were available to the population in both districts. Only a minority of health facilities and CMWs carry out several signal functions. Only 8% of the total births in one of the study districts are performed in public EmOC health facilities. Conclusions Both districts show a significant shortage of available public EmOC service provisions. Development priorities need to be realigned to improve the availability, accessibility and quality of EmOC service provisions by the public health sector alongside with existing activities to increase institutional births.
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  • Journal Article

    Formation and development of the male copulatory organ in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum involves a metamorphosis-like process 

    Quade, Felix Simon Christian; Holtzheimer, Jana; Frohn, Jasper; Töpperwien, Mareike; Salditt, Tim; Prpic, Nikola-Michael
    Scientific Reports 2019; 9(1): Art. 6945
    Spiders have evolved a unique male copulatory organ, the pedipalp bulb. The morphology of the bulb is species specific and plays an important role in species recognition and prezygotic reproductive isolation. Despite its importance for spider biodiversity, the mechanisms that control bulb development are virtually unknown. We have used confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and diffusible iodine-based contrast-enhanced micro computed tomography (dice-µCT) to study bulb development in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum. These imaging technologies enabled us to study bulb development in situ, without the use of destructive procedures for the first time. We show here that the inflated pedipalp tip in the subadult stage is filled with haemolymph that rapidly coagulates. Coagulation indicates histolytic processes that disintegrate tibia and tarsus, similar to histolytic processes during metamorphosis in holometabolous insects. The coagulated material contains cell inclusions that likely represent the cell source for the re-establishment of tarsus and tibia after histolysis, comparable to the histoblasts in insect metamorphosis. The shape of the coagulated mass prefigures the shape of the adult tarsus (cymbium) like a blueprint for the histoblasts. This suggests a unique role for controlled coagulation after histolysis in the metamorphosis-like morphogenesis of the male pedipalp.
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  • Journal Article

    Mortality of Different Populus Genotypes in Recently Established Mixed Short Rotation Coppice with Robinia pseudoacacia L. 

    Rebola-Lichtenberg, Jessica; Schall, Peter; Annighöfer, Peter; Ammer, Christian; Leinemann, Ludger; Polle, Andrea; Euring, Dejuan
    Forests 2019; 10(5): Art. 410
    Short rotation coppices play an increasing role in providing wooden biomass for energy. Mixing fast-growing tree species in short rotation coppices may result in complementary e ects and increased yield. The aim of this study was to analyze the e ect on mortality of eight di erent poplar genotypes (Populus sp.) in mixed short rotation coppices with three di erent provenances of the N-fixing tree species black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.). Pure and mixed stands were established at two sites of contrasting fertility. Survival of poplar was assessed for each tree two times a year, for a period of three years. In the first two years, high variation in mortality was observed between the genotypes, but no significant di erences between pure and mixed stands were identified. However, three years after planting, higher mortality rates were observed in the mixtures across all poplar genotypes in comparison to pure stands. The expected advantage on growth of combining an N-fixing tree with an N-demanding tree species, such as poplar, was overshadowed by the Robinia’s dominance and competitiveness.
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  • Journal Article

    Biodiversity data integration—the significance of data resolution and domain 

    König, Christian; Weigelt, Patrick; Schrader, Julian; Taylor, Amanda; Kattge, Jens; Kreft, Holger
    PLOS Biology 2019; 17(3): Art. e3000183
    ecent years have seen an explosion in the availability of biodiversity data describing the distribution, function, and evolutionary history of life on earth. Integrating these heterogeneous data remains a challenge due to large variations in observational scales, collection purposes, and terminologies. Here, we conceptualize widely used biodiversity data types according to their domain (what aspect of biodiversity is described?) and informational resolution (how specific is the description?). Applying this framework to major data providers in biodiversity research reveals a strong focus on the disaggregated end of the data spectrum, whereas aggregated data types remain largely underutilized. We discuss the implications of this imbalance for the scope and representativeness of current macroecological research and highlight the synergies arising from a tighter integration of biodiversity data across domains and resolutions. We lay out effective strategies for data collection, mobilization, imputation, and sharing and summarize existing frameworks for scalable and integrative biodiversity research. Finally, we use two case studies to demonstrate how the explicit consideration of data domain and resolution helps to identify biases and gaps in global data sets and achieve unprecedented taxonomic and geographical data coverage in macroecological analyses.
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  • Journal Article

    A Theoretical Framework to Derive Simple, Firing-Rate-Dependent Mathematical Models of Synaptic Plasticity 

    Lappalainen, Janne; Herpich, Juliane; Tetzlaff, Christian
    Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience 2019; 13: Art. 26
    Synaptic plasticity serves as an essential mechanism underlying cognitive processes as learning and memory. For a better understanding detailed theoretical models combine experimental underpinnings of synaptic plasticity and match experimental results. However, these models are mathematically complex impeding the comprehensive investigation of their link to cognitive processes generally executed on the neuronal network level. Here, we derive a mathematical framework enabling the simplification of such detailed models of synaptic plasticity facilitating further mathematical analyses. By this framework we obtain a compact, firing-rate-dependent mathematical formulation, which includes the essential dynamics of the detailed model and, thus, of experimentally verified properties of synaptic plasticity. Amongst others, by testing our framework by abstracting the dynamics of two well-established calcium-dependent synaptic plasticity models, we derived that the synaptic changes depend on the square of the presynaptic firing rate, which is in contrast to previous assumptions. Thus, the here-presented framework enables the derivation of biologically plausible but simple mathematical models of synaptic plasticity allowing to analyze the underlying dependencies of synaptic dynamics from neuronal properties such as the firing rate and to investigate their implications in complex neuronal networks.
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  • Journal Article

    Signal peptide peptidase activity connects the unfolded protein response to plant defense suppression by Ustilago maydis 

    Pinter, Niko; Hach, Christina Andrea; Hampel, Martin; Rekhter, Dmitrij; Zienkiewicz, Krzysztof; Feussner, Ivo; Poehlein, Anja; Daniel, Rolf; Finkernagel, Florian; Heimel, Kai
    PLOS Pathogens 2019; 15(4): Art. e1007734
    The corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis requires the unfolded protein response (UPR) to maintain homeostasis of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during the biotrophic interaction with its host plant Zea mays (maize). Crosstalk between the UPR and pathways controlling pathogenic development is mediated by protein-protein interactions between the UPR regulator Cib1 and the developmental regulator Clp1. Cib1/Clp1 complex formation results in mutual modification of the connected regulatory networks thereby aligning fungal proliferation in planta, efficient effector secretion with increased ER stress tolerance and long-term UPR activation in planta. Here we address UPR-dependent gene expression and its modulation by Clp1 using combinatorial RNAseq/ChIPseq analyses. We show that increased ER stress resistance is connected to Clp1-dependent alterations of Cib1 phosphorylation, protein stability and UPR gene expression. Importantly, we identify by deletion screening of UPR core genes the signal peptide peptidase Spp1 as a novel key factor that is required for establishing a compatible biotrophic interaction between U. maydis and its host plant maize. Spp1 is dispensable for ER stress resistance and vegetative growth but requires catalytic activity to interfere with the plant defense, revealing a novel virulence specific function for signal peptide peptidases in a biotrophic fungal/plant interaction.
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  • Journal Article

    Hypertension screening, awareness, treatment, and control in India: A nationally representative cross-sectional study among individuals aged 15 to 49 years 

    Prenissl, Jonas; Manne-Goehler, Jennifer; Jaacks, Lindsay M.; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Awasthi, Ashish; Bischops, Anne Christine; Atun, Rifat; Bärnighausen, Till; Davies, Justine I.; Vollmer, Sebastian; et al.
    Geldsetzer, Pascal
    PLOS Medicine 2019; 16(5): Art. e1002801
    BACKGROUND: Evidence on where in the hypertension care process individuals are lost to care, and how this varies among states and population groups in a country as large as India, is essential for the design of targeted interventions and to monitor progress. Yet, to our knowledge, there has not yet been a nationally representative analysis of the proportion of adults who reach each step of the hypertension care process in India. This study aimed to determine (i) the proportion of adults with hypertension who have been screened, are aware of their diagnosis, take antihypertensive treatment, and have achieved control and (ii) the variation of these care indicators among states and sociodemographic groups. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used data from a nationally representative household survey carried out from 20 January 2015 to 4 December 2016 among individuals aged 15-49 years in all states and union territories (hereafter "states") of the country. The stages of the care process-computed among those with hypertension at the time of the survey-were (i) having ever had one's blood pressure (BP) measured before the survey ("screened"), (ii) having been diagnosed ("aware"), (iii) currently taking BP-lowering medication ("treated"), and (iv) reporting being treated and not having a raised BP ("controlled"). We disaggregated these stages by state, rural-urban residence, sex, age group, body mass index, tobacco consumption, household wealth quintile, education, and marital status. In total, 731,864 participants were included in the analysis. Hypertension prevalence was 18.1% (95% CI 17.8%-18.4%). Among those with hypertension, 76.1% (95% CI 75.3%-76.8%) had ever received a BP measurement, 44.7% (95% CI 43.6%-45.8%) were aware of their diagnosis, 13.3% (95% CI 12.9%-13.8%) were treated, and 7.9% (95% CI 7.6%-8.3%) had achieved control. Male sex, rural location, lower household wealth, and not being married were associated with greater losses at each step of the care process. Between states, control among individuals with hypertension varied from 2.4% (95% CI 1.7%-3.3%) in Nagaland to 21.0% (95% CI 9.8%-39.6%) in Daman and Diu. At 38.0% (95% CI 36.3%-39.0%), 28.8% (95% CI 28.5%-29.2%), 28.4% (95% CI 27.7%-29.0%), and 28.4% (95% CI 27.8%-29.0%), respectively, Puducherry, Tamil Nadu, Sikkim, and Haryana had the highest proportion of all adults (irrespective of hypertension status) in the sampled age range who had hypertension but did not achieve control. The main limitation of this study is that its results cannot be generalized to adults aged 50 years and older-the population group in which hypertension is most common. CONCLUSIONS: Hypertension prevalence in India is high, but the proportion of adults with hypertension who are aware of their diagnosis, are treated, and achieve control is low. Even after adjusting for states' economic development, there is large variation among states in health system performance in the management of hypertension. Improvements in access to hypertension diagnosis and treatment are especially important among men, in rural areas, and in populations with lower household wealth.
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  • Journal Article

    Linking Arable Crop Occurrence with Site Conditions by the Use of Highly Resolved Spatial Data 

    Stein, Susanne; Steinmann, Horst-Henning; Isselstein, Johannes
    Land 2019; 8(4): Art. 65
    Agricultural land use is influenced in different ways by local factors such as soil conditions, water supply, and socioeconomic structure. We investigated at regional and field scale how strong the relationship of arable crop patterns and specific local site conditions is. At field scale, a logistic regression analysis for the main crops and selected site variables detected, for each of the analyzed crops, its own specific character of crop–site relationship. Some crops have diverging site relations such as maize and wheat, while other crops show similar probabilities under comparable site conditions, e.g., oilseed rape and winter barley. At the regional scale, the spatial comparison of clustered variables and clustered crop pattern showed a slightly stronger relationship of crop combination and specific combinations of site variables compared to the view of the single crop–site relationship. View Full-Text
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  • Journal Article

    Dementia with Lewy bodies: an update and outlook 

    Outeiro, Tiago Fleming; Koss, David J.; Erskine, Daniel; Walker, Lauren; Kurzawa-Akanbi, Marzena; Burn, David; Donaghy, Paul; Morris, Christopher; Taylor, John-Paul; Thomas, Alan; et al.
    Attems, JohannesMcKeith, Ian
    Molecular Neurodegeneration 2019; 14(1): Art. 5
    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is an age-associated neurodegenerative disorder producing progressive cognitive decline that interferes with normal life and daily activities. Neuropathologically, DLB is characterised by the accumulation of aggregated α-synuclein protein in Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, similar to Parkinson's disease (PD). Extrapyramidal motor features characteristic of PD, are common in DLB patients, but are not essential for the clinical diagnosis of DLB. Since many PD patients develop dementia as disease progresses, there has been controversy about the separation of DLB from PD dementia (PDD) and consensus reports have put forward guidelines to assist clinicians in the identification and management of both syndromes. Here, we present basic concepts and definitions, based on our current understanding, that should guide the community to address open questions that will, hopefully, lead us towards improved diagnosis and novel therapeutic strategies for DLB and other synucleinopathies.
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  • Journal Article

    Peri-hand space expands beyond reach in the context of walk-and-reach movements 

    Berger, Michael; Neumann, Peter; Gail, Alexander
    Scientific Reports 2019; 9(1): Art. 3013
    The brain incorporates sensory information across modalities to be able to interact with our environment. The peripersonal space (PPS), defined by a high level of crossmodal interaction, is centered on the relevant body part, e.g. the hand, but can spatially expand to encompass tools or reach targets during goal-directed behavior. Previous studies considered expansion of the PPS towards goals within immediate or tool-mediated reach, but not the translocation of the body as during walking. Here, we used the crossmodal congruency effect (CCE) to quantify the extension of the PPS and test if PPS can also expand further to include far located walk-and-reach targets accessible only by translocation of the body. We tested for orientation specificity of the hand-centered reference frame, asking if the CCE inverts with inversion of the hand orientation during reach. We show a high CCE with onset of the movement not only towards reach targets but also walk-and-reach targets. When participants must change hand orientation, the CCE decreases, if not vanishes, and does not simply invert. We conclude that the PPS can expand to the action space beyond immediate or tool-mediated reaching distance but is not purely hand-centered with respect to orientation.
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  • Journal Article

    Technical challenges of quantitative chest MRI data analysis in a large cohort pediatric study 

    Nguyen, Anh H.; Perez-Rovira, Adria; Wielopolski, Piotr A.; Hernandez Tamames, Juan A.; Duijts, Liesbeth; de Bruijne, Marleen; Aliverti, Andrea; Pennati, Francesca; Ivanovska, Tetyana; Tiddens, Harm A. W. M.; et al.
    Ciet, Pierluigi
    European Radiology
    OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted in order to evaluate the effect of geometric distortion (GD) on MRI lung volume quantification and evaluate available manual, semi-automated, and fully automated methods for lung segmentation. METHODS: A phantom was scanned with MRI and CT. GD was quantified as the difference in phantom's volume between MRI and CT, with CT as gold standard. Dice scores were used to measure overlap in shapes. Furthermore, 11 subjects from a prospective population-based cohort study each underwent four chest MRI acquisitions. The resulting 44 MRI scans with 2D and 3D Gradwarp were used to test five segmentation methods. Intraclass correlation coefficient, Bland-Altman plots, Wilcoxon, Mann-Whitney U, and paired t tests were used for statistics. RESULTS: Using phantoms, volume differences between CT and MRI varied according to MRI positions and 2D and 3D Gradwarp correction. With the phantom located at the isocenter, MRI overestimated the volume relative to CT by 5.56 ± 1.16 to 6.99 ± 0.22% with body and torso coils, respectively. Higher Dice scores and smaller intraobject differences were found for 3D Gradwarp MR images. In subjects, semi-automated and fully automated segmentation tools showed high agreement with manual segmentations (ICC = 0.971-0.993 for end-inspiratory scans; ICC = 0.992-0.995 for end-expiratory scans). Manual segmentation time per scan was approximately 3-4 h and 2-3 min for fully automated methods. CONCLUSIONS: Volume overestimation of MRI due to GD can be quantified. Semi-automated and fully automated segmentation methods allow accurate, reproducible, and fast lung volume quantification. Chest MRI can be a valid radiation-free imaging modality for lung segmentation and volume quantification in large cohort studies. KEY POINTS: • Geometric distortion varies according to MRI setting and patient positioning. • Automated segmentation methods allow fast and accurate lung volume quantification. • MRI is a valid radiation-free alternative to CT for quantitative data analysis.
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  • Journal Article

    Collembola interact with mycorrhizal fungi in modifying oak morphology, C and N incorporation and transcriptomics 

    Graf, Marcel; Bönn, Markus; Feldhahn, Lasse; Kurth, Florence; Grams, Thorsten E. E.; Herrmann, Sylvie; Tarkka, Mika; Buscot, Francois; Scheu, Stefan
    Royal Society Open Science 2019; 6(3): Art. 181869
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  • Journal Article

    Rocks rock: the importance of rock formations as resting sites of the Eurasian lynx Lynx lynx 

    Signer, Johannes; Filla, Marc; Schoneberg, Sebastian; Kneib, Thomas; Bufka, Ludek; Belotti, Elisa; Heurich, Marco
    Wildlife Biology 2019; 2019(1)
    Eurasian lynx Lynx lynx L. are recolonizing parts of their former range in Europe. Not only are lynx strictly protected as a species, but also their habitat and in particular their resting sites are protected. As the known characteristics of lynx resting sites are restricted to vegetation structure, it is difficult to take resting sites into account in planning processes. Here, we show the importance of rock formations for potential resting sites selection and analyzed the frequencies at which GPS-collared lynx returned to potential resting sites in the Bohemian Forest Ecosystem at the border between the Czech Republic and Germany. Lynx showed a strong selection for proximity of rocks for resting site selection, and the distance of potential resting sites to rocks was an important predictor for determining whether lynx return to the resting site or not. Furthermore, the frequency of returns to the resting site was positively influenced by the distance to roads and geomorphology. Our findings highlight the importance of rock formations as resting sites for lynx, which can help with the implementation of concrete protection measures.
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  • Working Paper

    Biopolitics and Displaced Bodies 

    Ince, Güler
    Göttinger Centrum für Geschlechterforschung, 2018
    For a geographic “place” to become a “homeland” or “home”, a community sharing a common cultural background has to take root there. The acquired place then forms part of the “body” of that community. Displacement turns individuals and communities into fragile entities by cutting their connection with their “place” and depriving them of their histories and bodies. The concepts of “borders” and “biopolitics” have gained prominence in the context of liberal nation states. In the view of persistent banishment, forced displacement, and population exchange in many parts of the world, contemporary border enforcement based on biopolitics serves to maintain control over bodies. This article will analyse depictions of the phenomena of exile, migration, immigration, and refuge/asylum in modern art with reference to the concept of biopolitics.
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  • Working Paper

    Song of My Mother 

    Yilmaz, Tebessüm
    Göttinger Centrum für Geschlechterforschung, 2018
    In the 1990s, Bakur (also known as ‘Turkish Kurdistan’) was exposed to mass state-inflicted violence. To supress the Kurdish insurgence and cut off the logistic support of the PKK (the Kurdistan Workers’ Party; Kurdish: Partiya Karkerên Kurdistanê), the Turkish state introduced new war strategies, such as forced disappearances and village evacuations executed by its security forces (TSK) and state- fostered counter-paramilitary forces (JİTEM, Hizbullah), leading to the displacement of three million people. Within a couple of years, thousands of Kurdish people were tortured, mutilated and forcibly disappeared. Their whereabouts remain unknown. This article investigates how state violence in the 1990s is depicted, represented, and recreated via cinematic narration. Erol Mintaş’s first feature film Song of My Mother (Annemin Şarkısı/2014) serves as a case study to analyse how forced displacement and resettlement of Kurds are visualised. Further, this account focuses on how the violence is remembered, represented, and recreated and which emotions are revealed while dealing with the traumatic events of the past and, finally, how the past is imagined and commemorated in the present. The visualisation and memorialisation of the 1990s in Kurdish culture contrast with the official Turkish discourse on memory and also provide a basis for collective societal confrontation.
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  • Working Paper

    National Belonging and Violent Norms of Gendered Migrant Citizenship 

    Dinkelaker, Samia
    Göttinger Centrum für Geschlechterforschung, 2018
    This article takes into view negotiations over the behaviour of Hong Kong-based Indonesian domes-tic workers as morally upright and respectable citizens. In collaboration with private agencies, the Indonesian government has actively promoted the temporary outmigration of female workers into low-waged and precarious employment arrangements as a strategy to combat unemployment and generate remittances, foreign exchange and development. The Indonesian labour migration program is, however, faced with the public’s anxieties and indignation over migrant domestic workers’ experi-ences of gender-based violence abroad and concerns over national dignity. As pointed out by a num-ber of feminist studies, “labor brokerage states” (Rodriguez 2010) meet the gendered contradictions of their labour migration programmes with appeals to migrant domestic workers’ morality. This arti-cle makes use of Judith Butler’s notion of “normative violence” (Butler 1999, 2004) to frame these appeals as subtle forms of discipline that police and regulate Indonesian migrant domestic workers. It addresses the strong role of female morality in defining which workers deserve protection and which workers can adequately represent the Indonesian nation on the international stage. By taking the case of Hong Kong-based Indonesian domestic workers’ self-organised and distinct enactment of a na-tional ritual on Independence Day 2014, I discuss how they appropriate norms of national belonging and how at the same time they challenge the subtle forms of violence inherent in moralising notions of gendered “migrant citizenship” (Rodriguez 2010).
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  • Working Paper

    Introduction to the Special Issue Gender and Violence in Contexts of Migration and Displacement 

    Hofmann, Susanne; Senoguz, Hatice Pinar
    Göttinger Centrum für Geschlechterforschung, 2018
    This special issue originates from the Summer Symposium Reconsidering gender-based violence in the context of displacement and migration held at the Georg-August University of Göttingen on 6-7th July 2017. The working papers explore different forms of gender violence, avoiding the pitfalls of a mainstream feminism that reproduces stereotypes of victimhood and marginalisation. Instead, the authors emphasise the role of power in relation to various kinds of gender violence, paying attention to the intricate inequalities that structure victims’ lives. The authors contribute to intersectional and actor-focused understandings of gender violence in conditions of mobility within or across borders of nation states.
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  • Anthology

    Gender and Violence in Contexts of Migration and Displacement 

    Hofmann, Susanne; Senoguz, Hatice Pinar
    Göttinger Centrum für Geschlechterforschung, 2018
    This special issue originates from the Summer Symposium Reconsidering gender-based violence in the context of displacement and migration held at the Georg-August University of Göttingen on 6-7th July 2017. The working papers explore different forms of gender violence, avoiding the pitfalls of a mainstream feminism that reproduces stereotypes of victimhood and marginalisation. Instead, the authors emphasise the role of power in relation to various kinds of gender violence, paying attention to the intricate inequalities that structure victims’ lives. The authors contribute to intersectional and actor-focused understandings of gender violence in conditions of mobility within or across borders of nation states.
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  • Journal Article

    Activity Correlations between Direction-Selective Retinal Ganglion Cells Synergistically Enhance Motion Decoding from Complex Visual Scenes 

    Kühn, Norma Krystyna; Gollisch, Tim
    Neuron 2019; 101(5): Art. 976.e7
    Neurons in sensory systems are often tuned to particular stimulus features. During complex naturalistic stimulation, however, multiple features may simultaneously affect neuronal responses, which complicates the readout of individual features. To investigate feature representation under complex stimulation, we studied how direction-selective ganglion cells in salamander retina respond to texture motion where direction, velocity, and spatial pattern inside the receptive field continuously change. We found that the cells preserve their direction preference under this stimulation, yet their direction encoding becomes ambiguous due to simultaneous activation by luminance changes. The ambiguities can be resolved by considering populations of direction-selective cells with different preferred directions. This gives rise to synergistic motion decoding, yielding more information from the population than the summed information from single-cell responses. Strong positive response correlations between cells with different preferred directions amplify this synergy. Our results show how correlated population activity can enhance feature extraction in complex visual scenes.
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